Lights will guide you home

& Ignite your bones

86,143 notes

flyypizza:

nobodyontheice:

crystal-poison:

“An anthropologist proposed a game to children in an african tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the children that whoever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run, they all took eachothers hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats.
When he asked them why they had run like that when one could have had all the fruits for himself, they said ‘UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the others are sad?’ (‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are)”

Literally the opposite of the American world view of “I can only be happy if somebody else has less than me”

This is beautiful

flyypizza:

nobodyontheice:

crystal-poison:

“An anthropologist proposed a game to children in an african tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the children that whoever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run, they all took eachothers hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats.

When he asked them why they had run like that when one could have had all the fruits for himself, they said ‘UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the others are sad?’ (‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are)”

Literally the opposite of the American world view of “I can only be happy if somebody else has less than me”

This is beautiful

(Source: ensligt, via heyennovy)

16,503 notes

unculturedmag:

Motoi Yamamoto - Floating Garden

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto is back with an amazing, new installation all made out of salt. Floating Garden resembles the ominous image of a tropical storm, similar to the satellite shot you’d see during a weather forecast. Using ordinary table salt, Yamamoto meticulously constructs his incredible works, this time spending more than 10 hours a day for over a week on the floor of The Mary Elizabeth Dee Shaw Gallery of Weber State University in Ogden, Utah.

The artist started working on the installation on February 24 and just completed it last night. The opening reception is tonight and it will remain on display until April 12. The salt, which was donated by The Morton Salt Company, will ultimately be dispersed into the Great Salt Lake.

For those unfamiliar with this artist, Yamamoto began working with salt in 1994 after his sister, just 24 at the time, died of brain cancer. In order to cope with her death, he began making art that reflected his grief. In Japan, salt is used as a part of rituals in some funeral ceremonies and also used to ward off evil spirits and welcome good ones.

(Source: mymodernmet.com, via novemberschopin)

9 notes

I believe I am justified in concluding, without exaggeration, that physically I shall be able to stand this life, in spite of all, for a few more years, let’s say from six to ten. I’m not going to take any care of myself or avoid excitement and worry; it’s a matter of relative indifference to me how long I live… so I am living like an ignoramus who only knows one thing for certain: I must accomplish the work I have set myself to do in a few years… the world is of hardly any importance to me, except for the fact that I owe it something, which I am morally bound to pay, since I have been wandering about in it for so many years and ought to show my gratitude by bequeathing it a few mementos in the shape of drawings or pictures not undertaken to please any particular tendency but to express sincere human feeling.
Vincent Van Gogh, in a letter, seven years before his death (via dumpsterandi)

(via q-uaintrelle)